Students seek out unusal study places

Peijia Zhang, Co-Features Editor

Some study space at Pitt-Johnstown easily may escape students’ attention because they are not as easy to locate as the library.

Next to the Office of Institutional Advancement, a well-lit room with windows on the second floor of Blackington Hall, there is a door of a darker room, numbered 280 by a sign.

One may find a paper notice on the door, saying that students may use the room to study, if open, after 5 p.m.

Vice President of Finance and Administration Amy Buxbaum confirmed this information.

The room is for faculty and staff during business hours, and can be reserved through the Office of Institutional Advancement.

It can be used for study purposes for students outside of business hours when the building is open, Buxbaum said.

“There are a few occasions when a business meeting is scheduled after 5 (p.m.). During those times, the room would not be available for student study (purposes).”

She said the room has been available for students to study in the evenings for more than five years.

A request for a comment from Interim Director of Institutional Advancement Tammy Barbin was not answered Wednesday.

Paul Newman, assistant vice president for Acadmic Affairs, said the hall is usually open, but the rooms can be locked.

“The (hall’s) exterior is open for the computer labs, but the (hall’s) interior is not usually open.”

Students seem to have various study space preferences.

Freshman nursing student Stephanie Snyder said she usually studies at the Student Union’s dining tables next to the information desk and in seats close to Blackington Hall window instead of the library.

“Probably because it (the library)’s too quiet for me. I like noise for (studying).”

A commuter, Snyder said she usually studies at the Union’s tables one hour before her class because it is close to commuter parking lots, and she has a class in Biddle Hall.

Snyder said she could not find a study space in Biddle. However, senior nursing student Lindsey Bunich said she sometimes studies at the lounge area at the second floor of Biddle.

Bunich said, since all her classes this semester are in Biddle, she sometimes studies there before her classes.

Freshman Jasmine Penn, a marketing and management major, said she studies at a dining seat next to the Student Government Association’s office because it is quiet there.

She said the area could be busy sometimes during rush hours such as lunchtime, and she sometimes studies at her dorm for a quieter study environment as well.

Senior accounting student Michael Zabrzeski, who is to be graduated this fall, said he sometimes studies at the seats near Biddle’s main entrance doors before classes and in the computer labs in Blackington Hall.

He studies on campus because he can get away from distractions at home, Zabrzeski said.